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. There doesn't seem to be near as many ...... How hard is CES compared to CPT nasm exam?


(^_^) How hard is CES compared to CPT nasm exam?. . There doesn't seem to be near as many study resources with the CES as the CPT.
With CPT i made notecards of each question i missed and reviewed them all till i got above a 95.
Anyone has their CES, anything i should emphasize in studying, anything to focus on more than others?


What is a good resource to learn locations of all those muscles, some of those pictures in the book don't really show you in a very good way where the location is.
I just took the practice exam after reading the first two chapters and got a 65%...wasn't familiar with majority of the terminology that wasn't covered in the CPT text. It looks like you need to know how each muscle concentrically and eccentrically accelerates/decelerates. The practice test sucks cause they don't show you the results and let you review the questions, it also doesn't tell you the correct answers. Seems tougher than CPT, but when i first started CPT i got like a 60 on that test

The CES and PES I found easier, because they are taken online and open book they are focused on overall comprehension not specific questions on charts or numbers. It isn't something to really give specific tips on or I would like I did the CPT, just comprehend the whole book and maybe reread it once. It should then be very easy and you get free retakes so.
Also the CES book is the shortest of the 3 so rereading it could be done pretty fast and is highly recommended..

When I took my NASM CPT in 2004. All of it was basically in the course corrective exercise, but only a touch. I took the PES soon after that that really covered Corrective, injury prevention and performance enhancement. Just a month after that I entered my MS program which had the students earning their PES for the degree. It was well worth it I got graded on my knowledge not passing the test for that class that was supposed for the PES cert. It was well worth it. Now Everything has been broken out CES, CPT, and PES. This is so you can specialize. Although I had to fight with them for two months to get the PES straight in the record. I don't think they still have my certificate number yet.
The key is read whatever you and read more keep learning. Find a decent anatomy and physiology book YOU understand. If you are coming from a different field i.e., business majors with no science background or Liberal arts, be willing to learn the science things you need. They are necessary to deliver a quality program.
Yes the specializations are online and open book. But they can be invaluable helping your clients. They are worth it. I am currently getting therapy for lower leg operations and the PT has been good to work with.

is the pes also online?
Yeah.

In the CES, there really isn't one thing that is emphasized over the other (like how the CPT was with p.169). Know it all and you'll be golden for the test (not to mention it's online ). AND I've found the CES to be more applicable to my clients than the PES. Emphasize the stuff that's confusing really. Make note if it's hard to remember and try to think of the situations with clients you already have. In all honesty, I didn't realize how useful the CES was until I started running into new clients that had such problems.
did you learn the eccentric/concentric acceleration/deceleration movements for every muscle? what about insertion/origin. Would that be easiest to learn them by muscle group first. Like learn everything in the lower leg and moveup once its mastered.
Seems like from reading the first 3 chapters there is A LOT OF small details to learn while CPT i think its safe to say you come away with a learned general concept and this CES is going to be much more specific.
I feel like i'm unfamiliar with a lot of the terminology and i'm finding it hard to comprehend. I may just try to read the whole book once then go back and read it again with the online powerpoint type presentation.
Did you use that website that the people who printed the book made? its listed in the front few pages of the book

Even if you are just paying a premium for a name, it's not that expensive and you expand your knowledge a bit. The better you are the more referrals you will get. Plus, if you work in a gym and it lists everyones credentials you might stand out a bit, a lot of gyms I've seen have a ton of trainers with one cert. or even cert. in progress listed. It's not like the general public will have any clue that earning your CES or PES was something you did online, they will just see more fancy letters behind your name. Can't hurt.
I currently work adjacent to a busy chiro office, the head chiro was stoked i had the CES and he's passed me clients left and right over the other pts at the studio
im happy with CES for sure

In the CES, there really isn't one thing that is emphasized over the other (like how the CPT was with p.169). Know it all and you'll be golden for the test (not to mention it's online ). AND I've found the CES to be more applicable to my clients than the PES. Emphasize the stuff that's confusing really. Make note if it's hard to remember and try to think of the situations with clients you already have. In all honesty, I didn't realize how useful the CES was until I started running into new clients that had such problems.

Don't mean to hijack, but are all these tests available online now? I was certified about seven years ago and we had to go to a testing center at a university. Wouldn't making the tests available online diminish the value of the certification?
Just wondering how things have changed over the years.
Thanks,
C10

I get the impression that most supplemental certifications (beyond your basic CPT) are just names that you pay a premium for.
I learned a lot from it, but in all honesty, I probably wouldn't have gotten the CES and PES if it didn't give me a raise at work lol but I'm kinda glad I got them because it made me want to become a better trainer and start learning more. The more I learn, the more I find out that I don't really know that much!!

The CES and PES I found easier, because they are taken online and open book they are focused on overall comprehension not specific questions on charts or numbers. It isn't something to really give specific tips on or I would like I did the CPT, just comprehend the whole book and maybe reread it once. It should then be very easy and you get free retakes so.
Also the CES book is the shortest of the 3 so rereading it could be done pretty fast and is highly recommended..
well the practice test seemed very specific. Lots of questions on the 4 subsystems and the groups of muscles in each. I read that chapter yesterday b4 taking the test and still didn't remember.
Lots of questions on eccentric/concentric acceleration/deceleration movements. I got a 65% but felt like a good bit of it was learned from CPT. Ultimately i WANT to learn origin/insertions and all the specific movements of each muscle it just seems overwhelming like it'll never happen. I think i felt the same about CPT at first though.

Now I know why they allow 3 chances to pass the exam. It isn't easy to answer 100 questions in 90 mins. If you are not prepared you will run out of time. I'm guessing most people need to take the exam two or three times to be able to answer enough questions to pass
How hard is the PES exam compared to the CES

In the CES, there really isn't one thing that is emphasized over the other (like how the CPT was with p.169). Know it all and you'll be golden for the test (not to mention it's online ). AND I've found the CES to be more applicable to my clients than the PES. Emphasize the stuff that's confusing really. Make note if it's hard to remember and try to think of the situations with clients you already have. In all honesty, I didn't realize how useful the CES was until I started running into new clients that had such problems.
is the pes also online?

I currently work adjacent to a busy chiro office, the head chiro was stoked i had the CES and he's passed me clients left and right over the other pts at the studio
im happy with CES for sure
are you speaking of "pts" as personal trainers or physical therapists?
personal trainers, ok. everyone loves personal trainers! physical therapists (whole other story)... chiropractors and physical therapists/physical therapist assistants have a huge competitive-business rivalry.
bottom line: CES is a great credential to have, sets you apart from your rivals, and clients/patients will want to work with you. Those with work experience and/or rehab-related degrees will find it as a review and studying the practice exam will give an idea of what the test will be like.

It makes u more knowledgable. Preparing me more for future training. Only $500ish so easily worth it

did you learn the eccentric/concentric acceleration/deceleration movements for every muscle? what about insertion/origin. Would that be easiest to learn them by muscle group first. Like learn everything in the lower leg and moveup once its mastered.
Seems like from reading the first 3 chapters there is A LOT OF small details to learn while CPT i think its safe to say you come away with a learned general concept and this CES is going to be much more specific.
I feel like i'm unfamiliar with a lot of the terminology and i'm finding it hard to comprehend. I may just try to read the whole book once then go back and read it again with the online powerpoint type presentation.
Did you use that website that the people who printed the book made? its listed in the front few pages of the book
Yeah, take it step by step. Memorize one thing at a time. It's a bit overwhelming as a whole, but page by page you'll learn it all. You'll also notice a lot of it within your clients so always think about it as your training as well. It helps a lot.
I didn't do anything extra except read the book, take notes of everything. Unfortunately, I had the v2 CES which had ZERO bolded words with definitions on the side of the page, so I had to do it old school with high lighting and just writing all the things I couldn't understand. The new book is amazing now with all that jazz like the CPT.

I get the impression that most supplemental certifications (beyond your basic CPT) are just names that you pay a premium for.
Unfortunately this, they lose a bit of their merit when you can test/retest and have the book open in front of you.
However, I will say the knowledge in the CES is invaluable and I recommend at least picking up the book for the knowledge.

I just took the practice exam after reading the first two chapters and got a 65%...wasn't familiar with majority of the terminology that wasn't covered in the CPT text. The practice test sucks cause they don't show you the results and let you review the questions, it also doesn't tell you the correct answers.
With CPT i made notecards of each question i missed and reviewed them all till i got above a 95.
It looks like you need to know how each muscle concentrically and eccentrically accelerates/decelerates. Seems tougher than CPT, but when i first started CPT i got like a 60 on that test. There doesn't seem to be near as many study resources with the CES as the CPT.
Anyone has their CES, anything i should emphasize in studying, anything to focus on more than others?
What is a good resource to learn locations of all those muscles, some of those pictures in the book don't really show you in a very good way where the location is.

Don't mean to hijack, but are all these tests available online now? I was certified about seven years ago and we had to go to a testing center at a university. Wouldn't making the tests available online diminish the value of the certification?
Just wondering how things have changed over the years.
Thanks,
C10
I get the impression that most supplemental certifications (beyond your basic CPT) are just names that you pay a premium for.

How much are PES and CES and which would you recommend first? To anyone that has either or both.

Don't mean to hijack, but are all these tests available online now? I was certified about seven years ago and we had to go to a testing center at a university. Wouldn't making the tests available online diminish the value of the certification?
Just wondering how things have changed over the years.
Thanks,
C10
NASM CPT is done in a laser grade testing center.
CES and PES are done online, both give you 3 attempts at th test, and both are of course open book seeing as how they are online tests. You are still timed for the questions but its obviously not nearly as pressuring seeing as you can use the book and are in the comfort of your home.

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